Clinical Leadership

The Midland Clinical Portal is being developed with clinicians, for clinicians, to solve clinical problems.

The Clinical Authority, together with the Design Authority and Operational Advisory Group, provides input to, and endorsement of, the eSPACE Programme's activities. These bodies also ensure alignment with national and regional strategies. Most of the important strategic decisions will pass through at least one of these bodies before being authorised by the Programme Board and implemented.

Our Clinical Executives are vital to the success of the Programme. They represent the needs and interests of those who will use the products developed by the Programme and provide liaison between users and the respective project teams.

Meet our Clinical Executives

Dr Ian Martin FACEM, Emergency Physician (Waikato DHB) and Midland Clinical Portal Clinical Executive

What does your job involve?
I’m an Emergency physician, so it involves lots of running around, supervising, communicating, negotiating, teaching; doing things fast, right, and while being interrupted, shiftwork, and balancing conflicting priorities and people.  Sort of like parenting on steroids.

I’m also the Midland Clinical Portal Clinical Executive.  There are a lot of similarities.

Why did you choose to work in this field? 
Emergency Department: Possibly out of foolishness.

MCP: Because I’m interested in IT, and like practicing medicine.  Anything that lets me practice medicine more and do dumb stuff less is good, and IT has the potential to take some of the dumb stuff off my hands.

What do you like about it?
Running around, supervising, communicating, negotiating and teaching. Doing things fast, right, and while being interrupted, shiftwork, and balancing conflicting priorities and people.

What are the challenging bits? 
Running around; supervising, communicating, negotiating and teaching. Doing things fast, right, and while being interrupted, shiftwork, and balancing conflicting priorities and people.

Who do you admire in a professional capacity and why? 
Lots of people over the years.  Watching an expert Emergency Physician on the job is like watching a top level skier hurtle through a forest unscathed.

The last book I read was…
...“The five dysfunctions of a team” by Patrick Lenconi.

If I could be anywhere in the world right now it would be…
...probably tramping.  Any of NZ’s National Parks would be good.

My ultimate Sunday would involve… 

...a thought- provoking discussion with friends.  Good coffee.  Some exercise.  Not working.

One food I really dislike is…
...asparagus.  I don’t eat weeds.

My favourite music is…
...anything that annoys my kids.  It’s one of the unique delights of being a parent.

Dr Andrew Darby, Consultant Psychiatrist (Waikato DHB) and MCP Clinician Workstream Clinical Executive

What does your job involve?
I work as the Clinical Executive for the MCP Clinician Workstream. Working with a team of dedicated health clinicians and IT experts provides me with the opportunity of marrying my expertise in psychiatry and leadership with my long-term interest in IT/Informatics. Working to produce a smart, electronic health record that makes healthcare more safe, efficient and effective is incredibly satisfying.

I am also a Consultant Psychiatrist who works in the General Adult Mental Health Service at Waikato DHB. As a clinician, the challenge is to understand the person, what has impacted on their lives resulting in their difficulties and how best to work with them and their supports in not only aiding their recovery, but also improving their resilience and wellbeing. I was recently seconded from my role as Clinical Director for the Adult Mental Health Service at Waikato DHB to the eSPACE portfolio.

I am also the clinical champion aiding the rollout of SmartHealth (a component of Virtual Health) within the Mental Health and Addiction service at Waikato DHB. I chair the Waikato DHB Virtual eHealth Clinical Design Authority that ensures the apps used in Virtual Health appropriately support clinical care. I also chair the Waikato DHB Clinical Information Reference Group that provides clinical prioritisation and guidance on the future direction of clinical IT development. 

Why did you choose to work in this field?
I initially chose medicine and then psychiatry as I like interacting with people and helping them to recover from their illnesses, understanding what makes them “tick” and finding a tailored solution that supports their recovery. 

From an early age, I have also been interested in engineering and machines – initially pulling apart clocks, radios, electrical & petrol motors and then motor cars. I can’t say my initial attempts at restoration were particularly good; experience was a good teacher and time a good healer. And with time, I became more and more interested in IT/Informatics with me now wanting to harness its power to improve the health outcomes of people. Working as the Clinical Executive allows me to combine my psychiatrc experience with my fascination and interests in processes, science/medicine and IT.

What do you like about it?
I enjoy being challenged by developing efficient and effective systems. The opportunity and challenges of merging two forms of science (medicine and information technology/informatics) into one product can be eye-wateringly difficult, yet equally rewarding. As a society, we “do life” over the internet: internet banking despite peoples’ initial fears of their funds vanishing (Nigeria still offers some challenges), internet shopping and trusting that we will receive the purchased article, and internet dating (not aware of any money-back guarantees). My challenge is to help produce a mental health and addicitions electronic health record that is as easy, intuitive and fun to use – just like internet sites we regularly frequent. 

What are the challenging bits?
The challenging bits are related to peoples’ expectations, priorities, timelines, and the multitude of ways “one can skin a cat” (no, I’m not referring to Gareth Morgan) multiplied five times over as we implement a regional solution to all Midland DHBs.

Who do you admire in a professional capacity and why?
There are multiple clinicians that I admire, clinicians who are not only clinically sound but have the patient’s wellbeing at heart, people who are prepared to make the hard calls and stand up for what is right, people who have a high sense of ethics, morals and justice, people who work with patients to find solutions relevant to their situation. And people who have a work-life balance.

The last book I read was…
Recent books I’ve read include: Lee Child – The Visitor (yes, I am a Jack Reacher fan), David Baldacci – No Man’s Land, and Patterson, Grenny, McMillan, Switzler – Crucial Conversations.

If I could be anywhere in the world right now it would be…
I wouldn’t mind being in Africa, touring a few game parks in places like Namibia and Botswana – visiting the Chobe National Park, the Okavango Delta, Etosha National Park, Kalahari Gemsbok Park, or scuba diving on the Great Barrier Reef.

My ultimate Sunday would involve…
After a morning session of sound engineering, there is nothing better than spending the rest of Sunday with family and friends, sharing a BBQ, some fruit of the vine and catching up on the latest weekend sporting action.

One food I really dislike is…
...rocky mountain oysters.

My favourite music is…
Genres that I enjoy most are Rock and Pop including artists such as Adele, Chris De Burgh, Chris Tomlin, The Corrs, Fleetwood Mac, Journey, Kenny G, Michael Jackson, Michael W Smith, Phil Collins, Vanessa Carlton; occasionally some country (but don’t tell my wife) and, dare I say it, Taylor Swift (probably because my daughter has drummed the songs into my DNA).

Dr Matt Valentine, Chief Medical Officer (Bay of Plenty DHB) and MCP Patient Workstream Clinical Executive

What does your job involve?
Emergency Department (ED) Senior Medical Officer: Working in Whakatane ED, seeing full range of emergency presentations. Some oversight of junior staff with this but mostly direct patient care.

Bay of Plenty DHB Chief Medical Information Officer: Probably soon to be renamed Clinical Lead for Informatics as it’s a better description of what I do. Which is, serve as a liaison between clinicians and IS in BOP DHB, help develop and support informatics initiatives internally and from the region, and represent the Bay of Plenty DHB in regional and national forums.

Clinical Executive for MCP Patient Workstream: Helping the project group walk a thin and blurred line between what’s achievable and what’s desirable (and when).

Whakatane Hospital Medical Lead: Kind of like a deputy Chief Medical Officer just for Whakatane, but without any actual authority. I try to help solve issues and improve care between services in Whakatane, so things don’t have to loop through Tauranga when it’s not necessary. Represent Whakatane issues and viewpoints in DHB-wide forums and conversations.

Why did you choose to work in this field?
Emergency medicine: I like the “jack of all trades, master of none” mentality; being able to have the ability to help in just about any situation. Plus, like the BMJ medical speciality flowchart confirms, I am crazy and have an non-existent attention span.

Informatics: Probably has something to do with my love of flowcharts.

What do you like about it?
Emergency medicine: I have the privilege of being there when people are having one of, if not the most, worse day of their life, and I get to help them. On a rare occasion, I get to help deliver a baby and be there for one of their happiest days.

Informatics: I get to try to help develop ways of making my clinical colleagues’ work easier and more rewarding.

What are the challenging bits?
Emergency medicine: I’m at the front line of seeing what the unmet medical and social needs are in the community.

Informatics: The lack of digital transformation in healthcare compared to other industries, and the slow painful grind to try to catch up.

Who do you admire in a professional capacity and why?
The guys who started and run the SMACC conference. They’re great doctors who have taken cutting edge education theory and technologic capability to medical knowledge dissemination and made a great conference and movement for all kinds of clinicians in prehospital, emergency and critical care. They get great speakers, who present in a TED talk-like format. Examples: The Golden Fleece, the Golden Hour, and the Golden Rule by Ashley Liebig; Cliff Reid: How to be a Hero; Things that Scare Me by Ross Fisher.

The last book I read was…
...Non-fiction: Thinking in Systems by Donnella Meadows – great intro to systems thinking. Fiction: The Lightbringer series by Brent Weeks – I’m a sci-fi/fantasy fan.

If I could be anywhere in the world right now it would be…
...I haven’t been skiing for a while now so one of those ski-up-to-your-cabin-door resorts in the Rockies would be nice, but it’s the wrong time of year.

My ultimate Sunday would involve…
...skiing, as above. Hot tub, nice dinner, good movie.

One food I really dislike is…
...bivalve shellfish.

My favourite music is…
...U2, Depeche Mode, The Cure. I remain a child of the '80s

Kate Yeo, Associate Director of Nursing (Waikato DHB) and MCP Discovery Projects Clinical Executive

What does your job involve?
I am an Associate Director of Nursing. I work with the Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer to develop the nursing workforce across the Waikato so it can meet the needs of the population, in a safe and effective manner, now and into the future.  My particular portfolios focus on nursing services outside of the DHB and how technology can be used to better support the health consumer and the work of nursing. I'm also the Clinical Executive for the MCP Discovery Workstream.

Why did you choose to work in this field?
Nursing:  I fell into nursing and ended up in this role because I always want to make it better.
MCP:  We need tools that help us to do our work. To do this you have to be involved.

What do you like about it?
Nursing: I love nursing because we are the navigator for the health consumer through a life change. All my knowledge and skills are used to support, encourage educate, and protect the patient and their family be that in ICU, ED or the community.
MCP: Being involved with MCP means we will get tools and workflows that enhance our ability to provide the best service.

What are the challenging bits?
Understanding and altering people’s perceptions of nursing so we can do the roles we should be doing.

Who do you admire in a professional capacity and why?
I have worked with some great nurses who could manage really complex clinical situations without losing site of the human being in the centre.  There have been some fearsome ward sisters (showing my age) who managed nursing, medical and allied staff like a conductor keeping us all on task without a missed note.  Now I watch people who are politically savvy, that can slowly get change done without disruption and upset, a skill I am trying to acquire.

The last book I read was…
I have been reading the Patrick O’Brian Aubrey/Maturin series.  I am also reading a history of BBC radio 4. 

If I could be anywhere in the world right now it would be…
Italy

My ultimate Sunday would involve…
Long brunch at home, on a summers day by the pool, with family and friends

One food I really dislike is…
Baked Beans are the work of the devil.

My favourite music is…
Fred Astaire, Ska and Gregorian Chant

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